Digital scent technology 

Digital scent technology (or olfactory technology) is the engineering discipline dealing with olfactory representation. It is a technology to sense, transmit and receive scent-enabled digital media (such as web pages, video games, movies and music). This sensing part of this technology works by using olfactometers and electronic noses.

History

1950s–1960s

In the late 1950s, Hans Laube invented the Smell-O-Vision, a system which released odor during the projection of a film so that the viewer could “smell” what was happening in the movie. The Smell-O-Vision faced competition with AromaRama, a similar system invented by Charles Weiss that emitted scents through the air-conditioning system of a theater.Variety dubbed the competition the battle of the smellies.

Smell-O-Vision did not work as intended. According to a Variety review of the mystery comedy film Scent of Mystery (1960), which featured the one and only use of Smell-O-Vision, aromas were released with a distracting hissing noise and audience members in the balcony complained that the scents reached them several seconds after the action was shown on the screen. In other parts of the theater, the odors were too faint, causing audience members to sniff loudly in an attempt to catch the scent. These technical problems were mostly

Samsung’s Note8

Samsung unveiled its Galaxy Note8 smartphone, positioning the oversized handset as the ideal choice for those who want to do bigger things. The new Android-powered device’s larger Infinity Display features nearly bezel-less full-frontal glass and an edge-to-edge screen. The Note8 comes with an improved S Pen that will allow users to communicate in what the company described as more “personal ways.” The Galaxy Note8 is both water- and dust-resistant, and it supports fast wireless charging. Under the hood, it features 6 GB of RAM, an Octa Core 2.36-GHz Quad + 1.7-GHz Quad 10nm processor, 65 GB of storage, and expandable memory.  Although the handset is built around a 6.3-inch Quad HD+ Super OMOLED screen with a truly wide 18.5:9 aspect ratio, it still can be considered a true “handset,” as it can fit in most users’ hands reasonably well. The S Pen allows users to send handwritten notes and even create animated GIF files from videos. Samsung has touted this functionality as a true step up from traditional text messaging. The S Pen is more than a stylus, as it features a 0.7mm tip that is far more

High-Priced iPhones

Apple made its long-awaited iPhone splash, accompanied by announcements of major upgrades to Apple Watch and Apple TV. The company launched two new generations of mobile phones — iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, and iPhone X — with enhancements in photography and device security in all models. The iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus are built for durability with a new glass back design and aerospace-grade aluminum bezel. They come in three colors: space gray, silver and gold. The phones feature a powerful new A11 bionic chip — the most powerful smartphone chip in the industry, and 70 percent faster than the previous A10 chip, according to Apple. Together, the camera functionality and the powerful chip are designed to provide a sophisticated augmented reality experience, with gyroscopes and accelerometers installed for accurate motion tracking. The 12-MP camera features a larger and faster sensor and high-quality video capture. The iPhone 8 Plus features dual 12-MP cameras and introduces portrait mode.

With the new glass back design, the phones can be charged wirelessly using the Qi ecosystem, with charging mats from Belkin and mophie available for sale. When AirPower

Online Shopping Revolution

When it comes to technology, there are many ways in this nebulous umbrella terms has changed our lives drastically, and many of them for the better.Tech take a number of different forms to accomplish a litany of different tasks, and the world today is a far cry from what it was mere decades as a result of bigger and better tech. Today is truly a golden age for mankind, in some respect. (cough, cough.) However, I would argue that there is one aspect that technology has all but perfected, and like many things, it goes unnoticed and is taken for granted. I’m talking, of course, about online shopping. Online shopping has taken what was once a huge hassle and turned it into the most convenient form it can be, for the most part, and I think that deserves more credit. Going to the grocery store every work or two was, and still is, a drag, bust just about everything else you could ever need is available online, so you can take care of the vast majority of your needs without ever leaving the house or talking to another human being. Sure, you have to wait a couple days

Effects of Emerging Technologies

Technology has affected and is still affecting people of all age brackets from all over the world. You can imagine the formats in which toddlers’ toys and items for old people are made these days. They are given touch of modernity to let them have the feel of the innovations the mind of the human person is capable of.

  • Internet Technology

Let us begin with Information Technology. Gone are the days when people melted for fear of where to get information or data for their usage. Whatever information you think you need has been well written out for you on the Internet. “Internet is the world on the computer”. The internet has a wealth of information on every area of human endeavour. It is a safe place of consultation or reference for students as well as professors. The internet is a place individuals and enterprise run to locate the information they need. For instance, when you need any service, just log into the Internet, and you will see one million and one individuals and organisations who render such services. Whatever it is you need, you can find it on the internet.

The world wide web

Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS)

Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are a class of devices integrating electrical and mechanical functionality on the nanoscale. NEMS form the logical next miniaturization step from so-called microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS devices. NEMS typically integrate transistor-like nanoelectronics with mechanical actuators, pumps, or motors, and may thereby form physical, biological, and chemical sensors. The name derives from typical device dimensions in the nanometer range, leading to low mass, high mechanical resonance frequencies, potentially large quantum mechanical effects such as zero point motion, and a high surface-to-volume ratio useful for surface-based sensing mechanisms. Uses include accelerometers, or detectors of chemical substances in the air.

Overview

As noted by Richard Feynman in his famous talk in 1959, “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom,” there are many potential applications of machines at smaller and smaller sizes; by building and controlling devices at smaller scales, all technology benefits. Among the expected benefits include greater efficiencies and reduced size, decreased power consumption and lower costs of production in electromechanical systems. In 2000, the first very-large-scale integration (VLSI) NEMS device was demonstrated by researchers at IBM. Its premise was an array of AFM tips which can heat/sense a deformable substrate in order to function as a memory device. Further devices have been described by Stefan de Haan. In 2007, the International

NanoTechnology

Nanotechnology (nanotech) is manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers. This definition reflects the fact that quantum mechanical effects are important at this quantum-realm scale, and so the definition shifted from a particular technological goal to a research category inclusive of all types of research and technologies that deal with the special properties of matter which occur below the given size threshold. It is therefore common to see the plural form “nanotechnologies” as well as “nanoscale technologies” to refer to the broad range of research and applications whose common trait is size. Because of the variety of potential applications (including industrial and military), governments have invested billions of dollars in nanotechnology research. Until 2012, through its National Nanotechnology Initiative, the USA has invested $3.7 billion, the European Union has invested $1.2 billion and Japan has $750 million.

Nanotechnology as defined by size is naturally

New Technology uses Sound Waves

A researcher at the Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey has created breakthrough new medical technology based on sound waves. The use of sound for healing dates back thousands of years and is considered a branch of vibrational medicine, but this new technology does something different: it’s called time-reversal acoustics, and will, when commercialized, allow doctors to see inside patients’ bodies, conduct non-invasive surgeries, and pinpoint the destruction of tiny tumors or kidney stones, all without a single cut from a scalpel.

The applications of time-reversal acoustics are wide ranging: imaging, surgery, even the recharging of batteries for implanted medical devices. Yet the big story here goes beyond the coolness of this new technology: the science of time-reversal acoustics will open the minds of doctors, surgeons and western medical researchers to the benefits of vibrational medicine. This sort of technology breakthrough — when coupled with the rapid progress in phototherapy, color therapy and homeopathy — promises to bring about a revolution in medicine. We are moving from the outmoded age of chemical medicine (where most diseases were described as “chemical imbalances” by the pharmaceutical companies) to the age of vibrational medicine, where the natural forces of nature

Biometric Technology

It’s already tough to get a decent job in the Obama economy, but increasingly, technology is making it even tougher. That’s because more and more functions of society are becoming automated that is, machines are taking over duties that humans once performed.

What happens to the data, though? 
Security officials are using more machines that employ biometrics which can verify a person’s identity through various physical traits and that has raised questions and concerns about the advantages and strengths of humans versus machines in being able to detect would-be terrorists. Industry officials told the paper, however, that the advantages of biometrics and computers outweigh any inherent risks, and as such they are promoting more automation as a way to make air travel more efficient and less frustrating.

Eventually, experts say, technology could “get rid of the boarding pass completely,” with air travelers’ faces serving as their ticket and pass, Michael Ibbitson, chief information officer of London Gatwick Airport, told WSJ.
He said he performed a trial last year in which 3,000 travelers on board British Airways flights were processed without boarding passes. The travelers had their irises scanned when they checked in, which enabled cameras at security checkpoints and boarding gates to recognize them

Technology to Allow Parents to Pick ‘Smartest’ Embryos

Eugenics is quickly becoming big business in China, where at least one genomics company is attempting to pave the way for parents to literally pick and choose the “best” embryos to obtain the smartest possible children. Quartz reports that the cognitive genomics (CG) division at the Shenzhen-based genomics company BGI is currently working on the controversial project, which could one day allow for pregnancies with “designer” babies.

Like the plot of a bizarre sci-fi flick, the goal is to create detailed maps of the genes of smart individuals for the purpose of identifying and selecting those genes in the embryos used for in vitro fertilization. Since as much as 80 percent of what determines IQ level is believed to be inherited, researchers believe that it may be possible to identify certain “smart” genes in human embryos that could be used to predict intelligence later in life. In this case, the BGI team is looking for genes directly associated with intelligence. Once identified, these genes could potentially be used as markers for choosing only those embryos that possess them in the proper sequence. Embryos that do not meet the intelligence threshold, on the other hand, could simply be discarded as “defective,” a controversial

Israeli Missile Weapons Technology

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new method for inspecting the large intestine, also known as a colonoscopy, a procedure so unpleasant, and arguably painful, that many skip it, despite its high recommendation for those over 50 years old. While the new, less invasive method is not a substitute but an alternative, it includes the patient swallowing a bite-sized camera that travels throughout the intestine, snapping internal photographs, which are then sent to a device worn around the patient’s waist and later reviewed by a physician.

Company background
The device, known as PillCam, has been around since 2001 but was unable to compete directly with a regular colonoscopy because of the photographs’ lack of clarity. The FDA’s recent approval allows the device to be used as a substitute for those who cannot undergo a regular colonoscopy procedure, a demographic of nearly 750,000 U.S. patients annually.  PillCam was developed from missile defense systems by an Israel-based company called Given Imaging (GI) and is available in 80 countries including Japan and countries in Europe and Latin America In addition to its Israel-based headquarters, GI maintains several operating subsidiaries in the U.S., Germany, France, Japan, Australia, Brazil, Hong

New light technology

New research on mice has shown that blue light stimulation of brain cells can recover memories in mice with Alzheimer’s disease. Furthermore, they found that artificial reactivation of positive memories through light could suppress the effects of stress-induced depression. A team led by RIKEN Brain Science Institute center director, Susumu Tonegawa, identified a population of brain cells that can be altered with light so that memories, emotions and even thoughts can be manipulated through a unique technique called optogenetics. Optogenetics integrates genetic and optical methods to control the mind. Its key molecule is a light-sensitive protein extracted from green algae, called channelrhodopsin. This particular protein can be inserted into memory cells and activated with fiber-optic blue light. Once activated by light, this protein stimulates its host.

The scientists found that optogenetics could successfully be used to manipulate memories in a mouse brain. They were able to implant a false memory causing depression which was then cured through the activation of happy memories. As reported by Open Transcripts, depression is a terrible brain disorder that globally afflicts 350 million people. In most cases, depression is caused by chronic stress and a series of negative memories.

According to Susumu Tonegawa and his team, negative

Nokia Smartphone Comeback

Nokia on Wednesday announced its return to the mobile phone and tablet business in connection with a larger agreement by Microsoft to sell its entry-level phone business to HMD Global and FIH Mobile for US$350 million.  Under the deal, Microsoft will sell its Hanoi, Vietnam, manufacturing facility to FIH Mobile, a unit of Hon Hai/Foxconn Technology Group. Workers will be given the opportunity to work for FIH Mobile or HMD Global, according to Microsoft.

Nokia will grant HMD, a newly formed company, the exclusive global license to create Nokia-branded phones and tablets for the next 10 years and will receive royalty payments from HMD for sales of those devices, covering both brand and intellectual property rights. HMD plans to invest more than $500 million over the next three years to support the global marketing of the Nokia devices, which will be paid for by investors and profits from the new business. HMD will be led by CEO Arto Nummela, a former senior executive at Nokia and the head of Microsoft’s mobile device business in Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Florian Seiche, senior vice president for Europe, sales and marketing at Microsoft Mobile, and also a former Nokia executive, will become

Lenovo’s Yoga Book

Lenovo’s recently unveiled 2-in-1, the Yoga Book, is available in Android Marshmallow and Windows 10 Home versions. Reviews have been mixed, with some praising its look and feel, but some considering its capabilities not up to scratch. Its Intel Atom processor doesn’t provide enough power for a workhorse device, they have argued. The Android version costs US$500 and the Windows version goes for $550. The Atom processor “was a cost-saving measure, because Lenovo hasn’t yet shown that its customers will shell out top dollar for a device with a sixth- or seventh-generation Intel processor,” said Eric Smith, a senior analyst at Strategy Analytics.

The Book’s 8500 math li-ion polymer battery is rated to provide more than 70 days of standby time and 13 hours of general use. It has a 10.1-inch FHD IPS 1920 x 1200 capacitive touchscreen with a 70 percent color gamut and brightness rated at 400 nits. The Windows version runs Any Pen technology, and the Android version runs EMR Pen. The Book has a metal housing. The Windows version is available in carbon black only; the Android device is available in carbon black, gunmetal gray and champagne gold.

The Book has an 8-MP

Apple Unveils Budget

The iPad upgrade has a 9.7-inch, 2048 x 1536-pixel Retina display with 264 pixels per inch, and Apple’s A9 64-bit processor. The unit will come in silver, gold and space gray with a starting price of US$329 for 32 gigabytes of storage and WiFi-only support. It will cost $459 for a 32-GB unit with WiFi and cellular support. As with prior models, the battery life for the new iPad is 10 hours. It has an 8-megapixel rear-facing camera and 1.2-MP front-facing FaceTime unit. The new iPad is available for order on Mach 24 from Apple’s website and will be in Apple Stores next week. With the latest upgrade, Apple’s iPad lineup looks like this: iPad Pro 12.9 inch ($799); iPad Pro 9.7 inch ($599); iPad 9.7 inch ($329) and iPad mini 4 ($399).

Apple introduced red versions of its iPhone 7 and 7 Plus to celebrate the company’s 10-year partnership with (RED), an organization that funds programs to help prevent the transmission of HIV from mothers to unborn babies. A portion of the sales of the RED iPhone will go to the organization, to which Apple has contributed more than $130 million during the partnership. Slated for availability

The Stupidly Dangerous Politics of Blame

I hope that, like me, you are off this long holiday weekend and have a chance to think about the drama that now surrounds the U.S. administration. What I find fascinating isn’t that the government is a bit of a mess but that the accidental transparency of this administration is focusing us more on the visibility of the problems rather than on the problems themselves. For instance, let’s take the issue with the Russians hacking the election. President Obama knew about it but largely sat on the information, while President Trump likely wanted to do the same thing, but leaks made it impossible. So, our focus currently is split, with blame going to one of the two administrations, when it should be focused on fixing the system so that the next election isn’t hacked.

It is kind of like having a barn fire and rather than getting the horses out before they burn, arguing over who forgot to turn the lights off. What is troubling about this is that in the face of some of the most dangerous digital times we’ve ever lived in, our government isn’t focused on making us safe it is focused on

Hacking and Linux

Ever since taking an interest Linux, with the specific aim of better understanding and enhancing my personal digital security, I have been fascinated by hacker conferences. As soon as I learned of their existence, I made a point of keeping tabs on the major conferences so I could browse through the latest videos in their archive once each one wraps up. I thought that was the closest I would get to such an event, but a couple of weeks ago, I had the chance to attend one for the first time: Chicago’s THOTCON. While I’m definitely still swimming in all the experiences I had, I wanted to share a few of my observations and insights. At this point I can practically hear you asking, “Wait, you said hacker conference? For security?” So, before I go on, I should explain a bit about the interrelationship between hacking and security.

The information security, or InfoSec, field is built on hacking. Without the latter, the former would be both impossible and pointless. This is because there are two sides to hacking. The more sensationalized of the two, often called “black hat” hacking, refers to malicious actors breaching a system

Snap Stock Snaps Back

Snap shares appear to have rebounded from the plunge they took earlier this month, after the newly public company released a massive US$2.2 billion loss in the first quarter, but investors still are scratching their heads over the company’s prospects. Trading just over $20 at mid-day Tuesday, Snap looks to some like it has regained its early bloom. Others suspect that darker days are yet to come, as signs of robust growth have been lacking. Snap’s revenue and subscriber growth figures missed consensus estimates in its first quarter, sending shares down to a low of $17.59.

Revenue rose sharply to $149.6 million in the quarter, compared with $38.8 million in the year-earlier period, but still fell short of consensus estimates of $158 million. Investors also were spooked by slow growth in daily active users, which totaled 166 million in the quarter, compared with 122 million in the year-ago quarter, a 36 percent gain. DAUs increased by a slim 5 percent from the 4th quarter of 2016. A “DAU” is defined as a registered Snapchat user who opens the app at least once during a defined 24-hour period. Average revenue per user rose 181 percent to 90 cents during

The 3 Technologies We Need to Change the World

  • Technology 1: Organic Printing

We can use 3D printers for plastics, ceramics, metals and some blends, but our efforts even to print food have been more in line with automated icing machines for cakes than printing food. If we could print food affordably using nonperishable components, it would mean not only that we would be better able to address the massive amount of global hunger that exists, but also that we potentially could cut the cost of food manufacturing and eliminate most food-borne illnesses. There is an amazing amount of activity in this area, suggesting that by 2030 we actually might have something like the Star Trek replicator in our homes. Given that this same technology likely could manufacture drugs and better prosthetics, this single step could have a massive impact on how we live far beyond the way we eat.

  • Technology 2: Advanced Bio-engineering

A division of Google is releasing millions of bio-engineered mosquitoes to eliminate those that carry sicknesses. Granted, I do remember that many apocalyptic movies start this way. The ability to manufacture insects that can address certain problems could have a massive impact, good and bad, on our environment. The bad would come from a mistake, or

Hackers Blast Emergency Sirens

Screaming sirens serenaded Dallas residents in the early morning hours Saturday after a cyberattack set off the city’s emergency warning system. All of the city’s 156 sirens were set off more than a dozen times, The Dallas Morning News reported. Officials have not yet identified the perpetrator of the attack, the city’s Office of Emergency Management Director Rocky Vaz told the newspaper, but he expressed confidence that it was someone outside the Dallas area. The city has figured out how the system was compromised and has begun working to keep it from happening again, he added. The sirens began sounding about 12:30 a.m. Saturday and weren’t silenced until 1:20 a.m., when the entire system was deactivated. Despite the city’s pleas not to make 911 calls about the sirens, emergency operators were swamped with 4,400 calls during the early morning hours Saturday.

Emergency warning systems in many cities are old, which makes them even more vulnerable to cyberattacks. Ironically, Dallas’ system is about to be overhauled the city council last fall approved $567,368 for the project. “Many of them were first installed in the ’40s and ’50s,” explained Mike Ahmadi, global director for critical systems security at Synopsys. “They’ve been

Apple Centers Health Data Strategy

Apple quietly has been strategizing to expand its growing healthcare business to include the management of digital health records, with the iPhone operating as a central data hub, CNBC reported last week. Apple has been in talks with numerous health industry groups that are involved in setting standards for the storage and sharing of electronic medical records, in a way that would help consumers gain more control over their private medical information, according to the network. The plan appears to be a natural extension of Apple’s recent health industry strategy, which includes its Research Kit, CareKit and HealthKit — platforms that allow developers to create apps that help patients, hospitals and researchers find new ways to collect, manage and deliver health data efficiently and directly.

“This has been an interest point as part of Apple’s strategy in the healthcare vertical for some time,” said Daniel Ruppar, digital health global program director at Frost & Sullivan.

Apple last year acquired Gliimpse, a medical records startup that helped collect data from different platforms and organized the information for patients. Thus far, Apple’s efforts largely have focused on fitness information, but in recent years it has moved into more